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Up Topic Welding Industry / Welding Fundamentals / Stair Stringer Angle Relationships
- - By aevald (*****) Date 03-20-2015 01:47
Many of you out there are likely old pros at doing stairs, but for some of those who might be a bit newer to the game I have a little sketch that might shed some light on how all of those stair angles work out and come together to make a functional stair. I may have a few other sketches that follow this same train of thought and I'll try to include those later. Best regards, Allan
Parent - - By aevald (*****) Date 03-20-2015 02:45
Here is a little something extra that some of you might appreciate knowing if you don't already do something like this.

I often see layout information included with stair prints that can be questionable when accuracy is of importance or a customer is difficult to please when the slightest thing is amiss. Detailers will round-off angular cut information and when you combine that with slight errors in burn line layouts and cutting skills or saw angle settings, it can result in less than desirable fit-ups.

Most prints will contain heighth information for stringers and length information as well. With some careful thinking and a little bit of math you can utilize the information to apply this particular fit-up check to your fabrication challenge.

The following sketch essentially shows how "triangulation" can assist with taking care of slight errors in the angle cuts and provide for correct stringer orientations. Best regards, Allan
Parent - - By CLH1978 (**) Date 03-26-2015 20:51
Great posts aevald!!! Thank you for sharing!!
Parent - By aevald (*****) Date 03-27-2015 04:10
Hello CLH1978, thank you and if you have anything to add to this area of the forum please do so! Best regards, Allan
Parent - - By kcd616 (***) Date 03-27-2015 14:26
Allan,
I like it
not the way I was taught, but something to learn from
thank you
sincerely,
Kent
Parent - - By aevald (*****) Date 03-28-2015 00:30
Thanks Kent, do you care to share the manner in which you approach stairs? I have used "speed squares", "stair gage sets on a carpenters square", "trigged out the first stair and used running dimensions from the front and back of that layout on up the stringer", "used a bevel square", and likely a few others. Would like to hear of any other methods as well. Thank you and best regards, Allan
Parent - - By kcd616 (***) Date 03-28-2015 13:43 Edited 03-28-2015 15:44
Allan,
framing square, bevel square, tape measures and levels... lots of levels
that was how I learned and still use it
do keep a roofing square handy
hope this helps
sincerely,
Kent
edit: combo square with protractor, and chalk line
got everything I think:wink::roll:
Parent - - By aevald (*****) Date 03-30-2015 07:33
Hi Kent, I just got done with this sketch and I believe that it illustrates some of what your comments allude to. Hope I've got it right. Best regards, Allan
Parent - - By kcd616 (***) Date 03-31-2015 22:08
Allan,
you got right
except for the board
never use a board, they are never straight
channel or angle... more accurate..imho
hope this helps
sincerely,
Kent
Parent - - By aevald (*****) Date 04-01-2015 05:02
Understand, thanks Kent. Best regards, Allan
Parent - - By kcd616 (***) Date 04-21-2015 01:04
Allan,
another for stairs
this is for fitting
I use house jacks to hold the runners up and sure everything is level and square
when tacked, before welding and install
works for me
even if I do the lay out, always triple check:wink:
hope this helps
sincerely,
Kent
btw house jacks not that much $ and well worth it for many projects
Parent - - By aevald (*****) Date 04-21-2015 14:40
Hello Kent, and thanks for sharing the info on house jacks and triple checking everything before proceeding. What's that saying "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure"?

I do have about a half a dozen house jacks and they come in handy for a lot of things. Thanks again and best regards, Allan
Parent - By kcd616 (***) Date 04-22-2015 04:00
Allan,
most important thing to teach, and learn
we can teach a monkey to weld (btw can not teach them heat distortion:eek::wink:)
but you can never ever teach them lay out and fitting
and as always do your homework before your work is due
ie "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure"
just my thoughts
sincerely,
Kent
Up Topic Welding Industry / Welding Fundamentals / Stair Stringer Angle Relationships

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