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Topic Weld Size on a Fillet Weld By pipewelder_1999 Date 11-03-2016 23:00
I'll play the dumb donkey, Is "Wash" ever referred to as a part of the weld ??

Wash Pass, yes is defined but in the context of the question it doesn't appear to apply.
Topic NDT By pipewelder_1999 Date 10-27-2016 11:43
Are you asking how many joints to cut out if a weld fails ??

You would only cut out the ones in which RT showed them unacceptable unless specifications dictated something else.
Topic AWS D1.5 CVN PQR Requirements By pipewelder_1999 Date 10-23-2016 01:58
No problem.
Topic WPS for welding repair of blade for hot section gas turbine By pipewelder_1999 Date 10-22-2016 12:26
The turbine manufacturer wold be the place to start. The type of test you must perform depends upon the code to be used

Are you the SAME PERSON that posted this ?

https://app.aws.org/forum/topic_show.pl?tid=9995
Topic "Double Eye Protection" for Grinding? By pipewelder_1999 Date 10-22-2016 03:36
The good ones....100%. The faceshield is not for eye protection only.
Topic AWS D1.5 CVN PQR Requirements By pipewelder_1999 Date 10-22-2016 02:43
The impact requirements are dictated by the AASHTO zone. We are in Zone II
Topic 3/8 downhill AWS Cert? By pipewelder_1999 Date 10-18-2016 01:19
No Seismic stuff, they stink if they ever have to be welded over with another process, and the thickness limitations.

Some of the mgfgs limit the deposit thickness based upon wire diameter.

But for what its good for, its good for it. Reminds me of a never ending 6010. 5/64" is my diameter of choice.

Hate the smell of the smoke. Im sure there is some bad stuff in there.
Topic 3/8 downhill AWS Cert? By pipewelder_1999 Date 10-18-2016 00:46
E71T-11 works well downhill. There are some not so good things about it, but not being able to weld downhill isn't one of them.
Topic Welding Leads By pipewelder_1999 Date 10-17-2016 00:34
https://www.osha.gov/dts/maritime/sltc/ships/ships_combined.pdf

I have never seen anything other than the basic warnings related to welding and electric shock. Not a specific lesson on leads.
Topic Weld Size on a Fillet Weld By pipewelder_1999 Date 10-16-2016 01:03
I am not sure what you are saying about the illustration. My point in the illustration is that the leg is NOT measured. Only the effective throat that equals that of a corresponding leg size.

Are you too familiar with the term "Wash". I must have been sheltered.
Topic Pipe Fillet Welding Qualification By pipewelder_1999 Date 10-15-2016 22:31
Tables for Tubular Qualifications in 2015 are in clause 9 however regardless, you should find a statement within the code that allows WPS's qualified to previous versions to be acceptable. So I would start there. However if you have to have 2015 compliant WPS's think about the below info.

Often errors in newly released codes that are addressed by errata sheets. Take a look at this and make sure your table you are viewing is not included. http://www.aws.org/library/doclib/errata-D1.1-D1.1M-2015.pdf

Below is the Text from the 2015 code about the reorginization of the Tubular requirements. Almost always there is an error in the tables in D1.1....Why ? Who knows.

The 2015 edition of the code has been reorganized. The tubular provisions, tables, and figures previously located throughout the code are now within Clause 9 entitled “Tubular Structures.” The reorganization required numerous reference changes and renumbering of the subclauses, tables, and figures. Many of the tables in Clause 4 contained provisions for Plate as well as Pipe or Tubing. The tables have been divided to only include Plate if contained in Clause 4 and Pipe or Tubing if contained in Clause 9. This separation of the information contained in the tables also resulted in many changes to the footnotes delineated in the tables.

Hope t his helps you in what you need.

Gerald Austin
Welding Inspection and Testing Services
Greeneville Tn.
423-914-1481
Topic Weld Size on a Fillet Weld By pipewelder_1999 Date 10-15-2016 22:19
No Idea what the wash is however if the profile in concave, the toe may interfere with the gage AND that method of measurement cannot be used. If only one leg is interfering, you could modify the bottom part of the gage and still maintain the throat measurement using the concave gauge.

If you are using the wrong side of the gauge, use the one for concave welds.

http://www.weldingdata.com/FilletWeldgage.htm

Gerald Austin
Topic TTS welding qualification By pipewelder_1999 Date 10-15-2016 22:10
I am sorry but I do not understand what you were asking in the 1st post nor your response. What I indicated in my previous post seems to be what you repeated in your 2nd post.

Hopefully you will get your question answered .
Topic TTS welding qualification By pipewelder_1999 Date 10-12-2016 11:55
I do not have a current SEC VIII however in the past, TTS specific qualifications were required only when invoked by the code of construction.

I do not fully understand the wording of your question.
Topic Stainless Tig Colors. How to preserve them. By pipewelder_1999 Date 10-12-2016 11:49
Far from obsolete.
Topic CWI Consultant/Independant Contractor By pipewelder_1999 Date 10-08-2016 17:12
I have called a few companies and not had much luck. Even the mention of general liability and welding has stopped a few quotes.

Do you have any companies you suggest that underwrite this type of insurance?
Topic CWI Consultant/Independant Contractor By pipewelder_1999 Date 10-07-2016 19:30
You mention professional liability insurance. Is it required on all of the projects you work on?

I understand the importance of having it as far as protecting yourself and your business but is it a "requirement" ?
Topic Recourse for certified welds NOT passing inspection? By pipewelder_1999 Date 10-01-2016 02:13
The term "Certified Welder" is the most abused and misunderstood term there is. One thing about welding is that there is a tremendous amount of variations in the skills and experiences of welder based upon industry and materials welded. A person may be "certified" for almost any type of weld from the easiest that can be trained for in hours to those requiring years of training and experience to get proficient.

The issue probably lies with the person who chose the welder without any understanding of the processes involved. A welder is "certified" when someone signs a document indicating a person has completed some type of task on a material, process, joint type, position, and other variables.

I would LOVE to see the project specifications written for this.

The inspector inspected the welds, did he verify the WPS (Welding Procedure Specification) ? Did he look at the fitup prior to the welding? Was he a "certified" welding inspector?

On the welds themselves some questions.

1) What was the acceptance criteria (Something that is ABSOLUTELY needed for someone to inspect)
2) Did the drawings show joint details in accordance with any code?
3) What was specified to the welder as to his/her qualification requirements ?
4) What if the "ART" looked bad, is there someone I can report it to ?
5)  Is the structure itself designed as a structurally sound structure? Are the joints of sufficient design to properly handle the service conditions? Did an engineer verify that it was sound?

Just a few of the many thoughts that this stirred up.
Topic Certified welds NOT passing inspection. Any recourse? By pipewelder_1999 Date 10-01-2016 02:10
The term "Certified Welder" is the most abused and misunderstood term there is. One thing about welding is that there is a tremendous amount of variations in the skills and experiences of welder based upon industry and materials welded. A person may be "certified" for almost any type of weld from the easiest that can be trained for in hours to those requiring years of training and experience to get proficient.

The issue probably lies with the person who chose the welder without any understanding of the processes involved. A welder is "certified" when someone signs a document indicating a person has completed some type of task on a material, process, joint type, position, and other variables.

I would LOVE to see the project specifications written for this.

The inspector inspected the welds, did he verify the WPS (Welding Procedure Specification) ? Did he look at the fitup prior to the welding? Was he a "certified" welding inspector?

On the welds themselves some questions.

1) What was the acceptance criteria (Something that is ABSOLUTELY needed for someone to inspect)
2) Did the drawings show joint details in accordance with any code?
3) What was specified to the welder as to his/her qualification requirements ?
4) What if the "ART" looked bad, is there someone I can report it to ?
5)  Is the structure itself designed as a structurally sound structure? Are the joints of sufficient design to properly handle the service conditions? Did an engineer verify that it was sound?

Just a few of the many thoughts that this stirred up.
Topic WPQ, wrong filler By pipewelder_1999 Date 09-28-2016 10:28
If the WPS was given to the welder and  wasn't followed , make him a NO HIRE!

If the test supervisor had one and didn't give it to the welder on paper or verbally, make him a no hire!

Of course just one man's opinion.
You must have a qualified WPS for testing. If the WPS allowed for any XX10 electrode, then life Its good.
Topic Need Some Work Help By pipewelder_1999 Date 09-19-2016 01:02
Wish I knew of something. Hope it all works out.
Topic New CWI, a little advice? By pipewelder_1999 Date 09-16-2016 01:09
Talk with the companies you have been working with as a welder. You will have more contacts that may be familiar with you.
Topic Relationship between hydrotest pressure and working pressur By pipewelder_1999 Date 09-14-2016 13:27
That's the place to get an accurate answer. I am not sure but each piping category may have specific information that applies to that category. MAWP is referred to I am sure but without a code handy I cannot say.
Topic New Forum By pipewelder_1999 Date 09-07-2016 12:41
Besides the format, I do like it. As an ex welding forum junkie, I do feel myself slipping back into multiple logins during the day.

But it is a MESS.
Topic Can i brazing with 99.99% fine silver wire? By pipewelder_1999 Date 09-06-2016 11:21
The eyeglass frames can be made of many different materials. Using a borax flux would not hurt anything. Regardless of what the filler metal does, the chances of oxidation/scaling are greatly reduced when using flux.

You could get on some jewelry making sites and probably get a better answer but except for a few alloys, I think flux would be the way to go.
Topic Metal Cored wire By pipewelder_1999 Date 09-04-2016 03:36
http://www.twi-global.com/technical-knowledge/job-knowledge/defects-solidification-cracking-044/

http://www.asminternational.org/documents/10192/1849770/06593G_Sample.pdf/bcce57ce-ef19-44e2-8d0e-88e5d23e5e05
Topic Metal Cored wire By pipewelder_1999 Date 09-04-2016 02:57
The center-line crease you see is probably the result of shrinkage and becomes more prominent with higher energy/travel speed welds. The last part to cool is usually along the center especially with a concave or flat profile.

A high depth to width ratio as in a deep penetrating fillet weld can cause shrinkage along the sides of the weld to be pretty rapid and the centerline of the weld has to absorb all of the shrinkage stress.

In extreme cases and certain conditions, it could be a crack however I have performed MT and PT on some of these indications and found nothing, in other cases I have.

A rapid travel speed, teardrop shaped puddle, and high voltages can work together to create this discontinuity. I would suggest cutting some samples and seeing if it is anything to be concerned with. Maybe it is, maybe it isnt.
Topic New Forum By pipewelder_1999 Date 09-03-2016 13:41
http://membernetwork.aws.org/
Topic NAVSEA S9074-AQ-GIB-010/248 NAVSEA S9074-AR-GIB-010/278 By pipewelder_1999 Date 09-02-2016 16:21
Gotcha. I think they will probably just develop something and get it off to a Levell III. Is the TP271 different than the old standard as far as LIII qualifications?

Thanks

Gerald.
Topic NAVSEA S9074-AQ-GIB-010/248 NAVSEA S9074-AR-GIB-010/278 By pipewelder_1999 Date 09-02-2016 11:28
I may have someone contact you. I was going to get something together here for a govt. contractor. I thought the course had to be product specific?

Gerald
Topic starting small business By pipewelder_1999 Date 09-01-2016 10:11
No. It would not fall under D1.1. That is for steel structures. Typically the designer/engineer of a product would decide what code/specification would apply.

Not sure what the product is etc... but someone/some organization has to design it, figure out if it will be strong enough, decide what must be controlled during manufacture, and BE PREPARED to be responsible for any losses due to failure.

Just "welding it per code" is only a small part. Who selects the code? Gotta Read the scope in each one.  Or write your own internal product specification.

Point is, there is much more to designing and building a product that some certifications if that product may fail and cause damage/injury. Not saying tons of things arent "made" daily that work and always will. It just takes on a different appearance when it becomes your business and you are concerned with liability.
Topic Houstin Schools - Arclabs By pipewelder_1999 Date 08-31-2016 11:28
Some community colleges coffer courses that are short in duration that can sometimes be useful for building or rebuilding your skills received during training that occurred in the past.

The usefulness of the training for your particular situation is widely based upon your existing skills, how you learn, and how the instructor teaches. We offered a 40 hour course for $525.00 that had people that had had never welded and some that had 8-10 years experience. All of those improved skills.

Lincoln Electric and other mfgs have training schools that have 1 and two week courses that I myself would love to sit in on, just to watch em teach. They may also be a great resource.
Topic starting small business By pipewelder_1999 Date 08-31-2016 11:12
Welcome to the forum as a participant. There are many on here with their own businesses and should give you some better answers.

Your need for "certification" is based upon the products you weld and the codes that govern them OR how you sell or market your services. You as the business owner decide how you are going to proceed as far as your quality system etc...

There is a bit more to fabrication of products that a "solid weld".  You may build a widget whacker in which all of the welds hold but the material fails because of design flaws related to the service.

Your welds are not backed really by anything other than how they perform. Regardless of how you do things, you will ALWAYS be responsible for what you do. All of the inspection and records will never relieve that. However being aware of all jurisdictional requirements (where they apply), industry codes/standards for your product(where they apply), and a system in place to control your processes (Quality Manual, inspections, Procedures etc...) will help you better control the quality of what you do and show an intent for you to try to do things correctly.

Read an R-1 form or RT reader sheet. Big waivers of liability for the inspection agencies however nothing for the manufacturer/contractor.

For your specific products, you could look at building procedures for welding that are specific to the materials, processes, and joints you will be using. Having a welder who has tested means nothing without a procedure qualified for the application. yes, a satisfactory weld can be made without ANY papers but we are talking more compliance.

You should receive some more information soon.

Have a great day
Topic New Forum By pipewelder_1999 Date 08-28-2016 12:48
I just went through this AM and made a few posts and tried to get caught up on what had been done, this is SOOOOO much easier.

Gerald
Topic Receiving "certifications" but not in AWS system. By pipewelder_1999 Date 08-28-2016 12:40
1) They let YOU know you can pass a test
2) The let someone else know you have previously passed a test to a certain code if documented.
3) It is something you can refer to on your resume.

The tests administered by an ATF are absolutely no different than those in a code. The difference may lie in the perceived validity of the test without the AWS backing.  That does not mean an ATF won't make mistakes or even violate the rules nor does it mean another organization WILL.

In my history, I have never been an AWS Certified Welder. However my resume has listed things such as

"Previously certified in accordance with (code of your choice) on (metals of choice) in the (positions) .

Other than getting in the boilermakers apprentice program, I have never shown past records of performance qualification to a potential employer. Show up with a hood, tools, skills. Use papers to start a conversation but when the potential for employment is hinged upon a piece of paper, reinforce your desire to show your skills.

There is NO WAY that a test performed by an organization other than an ATF can be used to represent a test in compliance with the AWS Standard for Certified welders.

EDIT: But that doesn't mean it is any less valid. I work at an ATF currently and we have tested more people NOT needing the "AWS Certified Welder" and just needed testing per code. I strongly suggest never resting your hopes on papers, just the ability to get em when you need em!
Topic New Forum By pipewelder_1999 Date 08-28-2016 00:25
This one is much easier to use. The lack of different categories is making it hard to follow.
Topic Spam Posts By pipewelder_1999 Date 08-23-2016 12:02
Again, a reminder to those in charge. If AWS is too busy, I would be glad to delet spam posts on a regular basis.
Topic WPQR limitations on diameter and filler tensile strength. By pipewelder_1999 Date 08-18-2016 22:53
Though the welder follows a WPS when testing, when they are done annd passed, they may use ANY WPS provided the production weld does not require them to weld outside their range of qualification.

The welder qualifies to weld on a production joint. He uses a WPS when testing that meets the requirements for trhe test joint. When he does a production weld, the WPS must be qualified for the production conditions and he must be qualiifed for the production conditions. The welder may or may not be qualified to weld within all of t he limits of the WPS. In addition, the WPS may not be qualified to do all of the conditions the welder can.

Hope this helps.

Gerald Austin
Topic Simple Question about Welder Qualification By pipewelder_1999 Date 08-18-2016 19:51
I am assuming D1.1. There are specific joint details called for in D1.1 for performance qualification test plates and reference is made to using a WPS. The WPS should apply to the joint being welded. That is its purpose.

However, the WPS may be able to be revised depending upon the code requirements for joint dimensions.

Gerald
Topic Combine 2 test results for 1 PQR By pipewelder_1999 Date 08-18-2016 19:47
There is no allowance in D1.5 for using 2 plates. in which one has impacts and the other does not. The cost for bends and tensiles will be a small part compared to the impacts.

I don't have a 2008 D1.5 so I may be completely out of touch. I am still in the "studying" process in preparation for assisting a company with developing a D1.5 FCAW WPS. Plates coming in tomorrow.

Gerald
Topic Suggestions for Ammeters By pipewelder_1999 Date 08-18-2016 02:17
Thanks. I found a fluke 325 that looks like something I can do.

The only thing that is critical just getting as accurate I can and a stable reading. I figured inverters may be a bit noisy.

Thanks for the advice.

Gerald
Topic Suggestions for Ammeters By pipewelder_1999 Date 08-17-2016 20:35
I intend to purchase a DC Ammeter for recording variables related to heat input for some D1.5 PQR's.

For voltage I will be using a regular off the shelf multimeter and take readings at the tip or neck. For amperage I am good with checking at the along the gun or the lead at the wire feeder.

I am wondering what people are using. I am not ready to put down the $ for a fluke unless I have to. I have seen some others that are listed as true RMS Ammeters by other companies. Does anyone have any hands on experience with something in the sub $200.00 range on inverter power supplies ? If so, what models have worked.

I have also considered an inline Shunt/Meter before at the wire feeder/lead connection.

I welcome any thoughts.

Thanks

Gerald Austin
Topic Fillet weld inspection By pipewelder_1999 Date 08-17-2016 19:48
The throat should meet the size of that specified. So regardless of the leg size, the throat must be that of a 1/4" fillet weld. However you can only measure the throat only if the contour is concave.

If the weld is flat or convex on the face, the throat will meet that of the leg size. If the face is concave, the throat has no relationship to the leg size and thus a throat gauge is required.

In some countries and even with some companies here, fillet weld sizes are specified by the throat dimension required.

http://www.weldingdata.com/FilletWeldgage.htm may help but I am not sure. It is in the context of the question.

I think, if the throat meets that of a 1/4" and the contour is concave, the size is met.

Gerald
Topic Spam Posts By pipewelder_1999 Date 08-12-2016 10:37
I would be more than happy to assist with deleting Spam!
Topic Shielding Gas Manifold System Leaks By pipewelder_1999 Date 08-11-2016 16:18
Thus the reality of WELDED vs mechanical fittings.  Hmmm 10k per month, wonder how many months to pay for REAL piping? :)

Can you reduce your manifold pressure a bit to reduce your losses in the meantime or are you using flow control at the stations that requires the pressure you are running?

Gerald
Topic Welder Qualification, using B2.1 SWPS, to other Standards By pipewelder_1999 Date 08-10-2016 14:06
I agree. I think the system of testing welders should be a documented system and auditable.

I let students know that a certification is just a document that shows they had the ability to pass a test and that most companies worth working for will want you to test again and if they accept a prior record of certification and are not familar with the test, use extreme caution.

I let contractors know that end users/owners may or may nnoot acccept what is provided and to also know the difference between an "AWS certified Welder" and a Welder Certified in accordance with AWS XX.XX. And that the welder has displayed no different skills and is limited by the range of qualification allowed by the applicable code.

The wallet cards in my opinion are TRASH and I would never accept one. I want to see a signed WPQR with all of the data required by the code.

I think the term "certified" is the most abused in the industry.  I myself would love to incorporate video recording into testing but haven't figured out where the $ comes from.

Have a great day Larry.

Gerald
Topic Welder Qualification, using B2.1 SWPS, to other Standards By pipewelder_1999 Date 08-10-2016 11:07
Our quality system, the supporting WPQR, and AWS D1.1 allow for use of an SWPS. The applicability of an SWPS (or any other WPS) for production is at the discretion of the Engineer. For performance qualification the engineer has the right to accept or reject the qualifications on the basis of using an SWPS, but if he does, he has no sound engineering basis to do so provided all requirements of D1.1 were met during performance qualification. The WPS is NOT the WPQR.

As an ATF we recently ran into the need for this when a customer needed GTAW WPQ's quickly. (As to why GTAW is not prequalified but secret voodoo complicated spray/pulse/waveform controlled GMAW is, beats me)

When SWPS's are used, we will review the SWPS AND the code requirements with the welder. The applicable acceptance criteria is referred to on the WPQR both for visual and destructive tests.

The WPQR references the WPS but also references the code AWS D1.1. Thus a record with evidence as to what was done.

It is my understanding that SWP's are typically supported by multiple PQR's which are performed in accordance with various codes. 

"All SWPSs are supported by Procedure Qualification Records (PQRs) which meet the rules of AWS B2.1 and which in addition are intended to meet the rules of the major codes which govern the intended applications such as AWS Structural Codes (D1.1, D1.2, D1.3, etc.), AWS Sheet Metal Welding Code (D9.1),ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section IX, NAVSEA Technical Publication......" Taken from http://www.aws.org/standards/page/standard-welding-procedure-specifications-swps

Though the ranges listed on the SWPS for joints may allow for joints outside the scope of a code, using one is not a violation of any kind per D1.1. If an SWPS is followed during performance qualification there is absolutely noting wrong with it provided the requirements of D1.1 are met.

If anyone is in a situation in which the WPS is the sole source for welding details, there are bigger problems. No drawings? No reference to code requirements? Just a welder with a piece of paper ?

There are two lines of thought in my mind when it comes to documents related to welding. 1) Make them specific to an individual joint with specific settings for the application, position, etc...  OR 2) Make them to meet the requirements of the code (which was reviewed by many industry "experts") and if supplementary information is needed, supply it to the welder OR just let him use the skill that he/she has to make sound welds. In cases where strict adherence to the OH SO CRITICAL amperage/voltage/travel speed/ waveform/solar flares is needed, supervise what the welder is doing and provide monitoring..

I usually qualify and test our procedures or prepare prequalified ones. It is my opinion that performing volumetric testing as required by D1.1 does nothing to establish the validity of the parameters used during a PQR so I try to stay away from that but do have  GMAW Short Circuit that has passed bends and tensile for Sec IX that I will probably do again for Volumetric testing and Mechanicals per D1.1. Just in case.

The above is just an opinion based upon my understanding so is very likely to have points worth discussing, correcting or clarifying. Its early so I haven't reached my quota of mistakes yet!

Hope everyone has a wonderful day.

Gerald Austin
Greeneville Tn
Topic thickness X 1.1 ASME IX By pipewelder_1999 Date 08-09-2016 23:40
Sorry but not sure the questions. But maybe its like a game of jeopardy.

GMAW Short Circuit Transfer is a process ....
Topic essential variable By pipewelder_1999 Date 08-09-2016 21:30
For D1.5, most of the variables for performance would be under para 5.24. Tak a look there.

Do understand that the electrode size on the D11.5 wps must be followed.
Topic Old Forum New Forum By pipewelder_1999 Date 08-07-2016 20:06
Sometimes, a little spam with good people is better than prime rib without em!

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