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Topic jon20013 Jon Lambert has passed. By pipewelder_1999 Date 03-06-2017 11:37
Sad to hear. He seemed very passionate about sharing his knowledge.
Topic AWS D17.1 Welder Qualification By pipewelder_1999 Date 02-16-2017 20:18
I am not a fan of 17.1 as far as how a code is written.

I have looked through it and there is NOT an general statement as in other codes stating what you have mentioned.

So therefore, you must look at the variables for qualification of the operators.  5.2.2.2 refers you to only the 1st 3 variables above. No reference is made to any variable that is "operator specific" such as manual controls of joint tracking, speed, etc....

The AWS 3.0 definitions are referred to for operator and welder but have no purpose as far as defining qualification requirements.

So ask yourself what variables must apply to operator qualification? Not very many!

Then on the other side of things, look at the variables required for a welder. Nothing there that distinguishes a welder from an operator either. A person could follow all of the requirements for a welder on a mchine weld, does that make them qualified as a welder???

The only distiguishing thing left is the definitions. I'm safe testing each type on each type.

Sorry I wasn't much help. I do not see anything that allows an operator to be qualified by virtue of manual or semi-auto welding. If it does, then the opposite works too based upon my logic.

I only glanced through my .pdf version of the code using the search term "Operator" and "Machine" independently an nothing jumped out at me. I did not re-read the code from cover to cover.
Topic dissimilar procedure/qual question By pipewelder_1999 Date 02-02-2017 12:00
QW-423.1 I believe refers to the range of Pnumbers for performance.
Topic ASME IX QW-301.2 By pipewelder_1999 Date 01-31-2017 15:47
As the paragraph you quoted states,  Preheat or PWHT may be omitted.

Since for performance qualification, plain carbon steel base metals can be used to qualify for many other base metals, this should seldom be an issue.

In the case where an organization has the desire to use crack sensitive materials, then preheat would be an issue and regardless of the allowance, should be applied.

the WQT does NOT require preheat/pwht in accordance with the WPS.
Topic dissimilar procedure/qual question By pipewelder_1999 Date 01-26-2017 19:17
He could qualify to make those welds provided all of the filler metals you refer to are for GTAW (F-6)

He would of course need a qualified procedure to make the production welds.

If you follow all of the P-number requirements, you will find out that for performance, substitutions are allowed. P1 qualifies P1 hrough P11, P3x, P4x base metals.
Topic Trouble with trapped slag on hotpass By pipewelder_1999 Date 01-23-2017 16:14
Turn it up for the overhead.

Its just like flat but harder on your neck and of course when the slag peels off in one big piece, it may fall on you :)
Topic Trouble with trapped slag on hotpass By pipewelder_1999 Date 01-19-2017 16:43
I think there are a couple of things contributing to your difficulties.

1) In real life, the joint design you describe is a challenge for anyone with the method you describe. Not impossible, but difficult. A typical open root prep for a 6010 root pass would almost always have an included angle of 60 Degrees Minimum. A change in weld prep could help but I understand this may be a fixed setup that is always used...WHY who knows.

2) The issue with slag on the pass placed over the root which in many circles is referred to as the hot pass is probably NOT because of slag but more the result of convexity on the bead. In many "real life" operations, the 2nd pass would be deposited with an XX10 electrode and NOT a 7018. The 2nd pass would have a much flatter profile AND the width of the face of the weld would be wider and therefore better facilitate getting the big ole 1/8" 7018 in the joint with a nice tight arc and also room for manipulation.

If all of the slag were removed from the toes of the 2nd pass bead, defects would probably still occur if the profile were still convex.

Reducing the convexity would result in reducing the discontinuities along the toes. Because of the difficulties associated with the joint you describe, a wider 2nd bead with more pause on the sides and less time in the middle may help. An adjustment of amperage can sometimes help and I have found a sweet spot for 7018 to be in the 110 range and anything much below 105  gives me issues unless welding on lighter material

3) 1/8" E7018 can be a challenge for many when the conditions are ideal. The settings, arc length, and manipulation all play a key part in what happens. I am assuming you have already welded a plate on backing. If it were fitup like typical joints of that type, then there is plenty of room to manipulate the electrode as shown in the image attached. Because of the conditions, all of the things that work to correct convexity as you learned to weld with 7018 are now more critical.

I have not walked in your shoes or those of your instructor so what you are doing may have a purpose. All variables in a given weld work together. Amperage, Voltage(Arc Length), Travel Speed, Manipulation, Groove Angle, Root Opening, Root Face, Preheat, etc.. Changing one will always change the results unless something else is changed along with it.
Attachment: Drawing1.jpg (522k)
Topic CWI Exam codebook By pipewelder_1999 Date 01-19-2017 15:56
For those that say the exam is easier, ask them if they have taken it with both. I have tested and passed with D1.1 and B31.1/Sec IX but never tried 1104.

Everyone has different experiences. Its my suggestion to use the code you have been using.
Topic Temporary weld on pressure vessels (Sect IX) By pipewelder_1999 Date 01-06-2017 01:56
Temporary or any other weld must be performed by an organization authorized to weld on pressure vessels. The WPS and Welder qualifications mean nothing without being the authorized organization.

This is assuming an ASME pressure vessel.
Topic Welding Engineering info? By pipewelder_1999 Date 12-16-2016 11:57
There is some info all over the internet.

https://www.skillscommons.org/discover?query=welding

http://www.esabna.com/euweb/awtc/lesson1_1.htm

But the best all in one resource is the AWS Welding Handbook, 8/9th edition. Volume 1 is my favorite.

Gerald Austin

www.weldingdata.com

Greeneville Tn.
Topic AWS CODE ON DRAWINGS By pipewelder_1999 Date 12-14-2016 22:19
If you are the design authority, you may select whatever you like based upon the intended use of t he product unless there is some jurisdictional law requiring parts be designed, manufactured(built), inspected and tested in accordance with a specific standard..

AWS Has numerous codes and standards that may be applied to your product. Obviously using one for structural steel for stainless sheet metal will lead to eventual problems. Not with the product per se but with the documentation that supports it and may be passed on to customers or subcontractors.

Take a LOOK AT https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_welding_codes AND JUST PICK YA ONE OUT :)
Topic Part B Confusing Question By pipewelder_1999 Date 12-05-2016 11:35
One thing to understand regarding heat input is that it is controlled during welding and the value is listed on the WPS. Because ranges for Amps/Volts/Travel speed may allow for settings that exceed the max heat input.

However your formula should be
Heat Input (Joules per minute) = (Volts x Amps x 60) / Travel Speed (IPM)

You are using the Wire Feed Speed which has nothing to do with calculating heat input.

Regardless, I may very well have a WPS in which heat input is required to be controlled yet the right "mix" of variables within the ranges allowed could result in not meeting the requirements. As the welder and inspector, I would need to verify that the ranges used DURING PRODUCTION are within the heat input requirements of the WPS.

I am not familiar with the specifications related to the new part B so their may be some other limiting factor to consider but your travel speed value is outta whack regardless.

Hope this helps.

Have a great day.

Gerald Austin
Weldingdata.com
Greeneville, Tn
423-914-1481
Topic Welding defectsin 4130 By pipewelder_1999 Date 12-04-2016 18:05
Can you provide a joint design?

Was the crack along HAZ or Centerline?

Was the crack detected right after welding the root or after completion of the entire weld?

Was preheat dropped prior to PWHT ?

What was the cooling rate after Welding and PWHT.?

Was the item attached to any operating machinery ?

Was any in-process inspection performed on the root pass or intermediate passes.?

If it was a saddle on connection, was the run pipe prepared to allow the hole to line up precisely with the ID of the branch?

With a tight groove angle, concave root contour, and a deep depth to width things can be difficult. I imagine this is a saddled on nozzle and not through the shell.
Topic WPS / PQR By pipewelder_1999 Date 11-15-2016 00:10
QG-108 QUALIFICATIONS MADE TO PREVIOUS EDITIONS
Joining procedures, procedure qualifications, and performance qualifications that were made in accordance with Editions and Addenda of this Section as far back as the 1962 Edition may be used in any construction for which the current Edition has been specified. Joining procedures, procedure qualifications, and performance qualifications that were made in accordance with Editions and Addenda of this Section prior to the 1962 Edition may be used in any construction for which the current Edition has been specified provided the
requirements of the 1962 Edition or any later edition have been met.

Procedure specifications, PQRs, and performance qualification records meeting the above requirements do not require amendment to include any variables required by later Editions and Addenda, except as specified in QW-420. Qualification of new procedure specifications for joining processes, and performance qualifications for persons applying them, shall be in accordance with the current Edition of Section IX
Topic WPS / PQR By pipewelder_1999 Date 11-13-2016 20:27
In most codes, there is no expiration on a PQR. A company could qualify a procedure and record the data on the PQR and at a later date, prepare a new WPS within the qualified ranges of the applicable code.

In many cases, a single PQR may support various WPS's as is the case with ASME Sec IX.
Topic weld repair By pipewelder_1999 Date 11-08-2016 18:12
You must evaluate the reasons for rejects. Identify the possible causes, and review what can be done to control the possible causes.

Is the acceptance criteria being exceeded. Are defects related to a specific welder, material, WPS, crew, etc...

Have great day and some more information could be useful.
Gerald Austin
Topic Weld Size on a Fillet Weld By pipewelder_1999 Date 11-03-2016 23:00
I'll play the dumb donkey, Is "Wash" ever referred to as a part of the weld ??

Wash Pass, yes is defined but in the context of the question it doesn't appear to apply.
Topic NDT By pipewelder_1999 Date 10-27-2016 11:43
Are you asking how many joints to cut out if a weld fails ??

You would only cut out the ones in which RT showed them unacceptable unless specifications dictated something else.
Topic AWS D1.5 CVN PQR Requirements By pipewelder_1999 Date 10-23-2016 01:58
No problem.
Topic WPS for welding repair of blade for hot section gas turbine By pipewelder_1999 Date 10-22-2016 12:26
The turbine manufacturer wold be the place to start. The type of test you must perform depends upon the code to be used

Are you the SAME PERSON that posted this ?

https://app.aws.org/forum/topic_show.pl?tid=9995
Topic "Double Eye Protection" for Grinding? By pipewelder_1999 Date 10-22-2016 03:36
The good ones....100%. The faceshield is not for eye protection only.
Topic AWS D1.5 CVN PQR Requirements By pipewelder_1999 Date 10-22-2016 02:43
The impact requirements are dictated by the AASHTO zone. We are in Zone II
Topic 3/8 downhill AWS Cert? By pipewelder_1999 Date 10-18-2016 01:19
No Seismic stuff, they stink if they ever have to be welded over with another process, and the thickness limitations.

Some of the mgfgs limit the deposit thickness based upon wire diameter.

But for what its good for, its good for it. Reminds me of a never ending 6010. 5/64" is my diameter of choice.

Hate the smell of the smoke. Im sure there is some bad stuff in there.
Topic 3/8 downhill AWS Cert? By pipewelder_1999 Date 10-18-2016 00:46
E71T-11 works well downhill. There are some not so good things about it, but not being able to weld downhill isn't one of them.
Topic Welding Leads By pipewelder_1999 Date 10-17-2016 00:34
https://www.osha.gov/dts/maritime/sltc/ships/ships_combined.pdf

I have never seen anything other than the basic warnings related to welding and electric shock. Not a specific lesson on leads.
Topic Weld Size on a Fillet Weld By pipewelder_1999 Date 10-16-2016 01:03
I am not sure what you are saying about the illustration. My point in the illustration is that the leg is NOT measured. Only the effective throat that equals that of a corresponding leg size.

Are you too familiar with the term "Wash". I must have been sheltered.
Topic Pipe Fillet Welding Qualification By pipewelder_1999 Date 10-15-2016 22:31
Tables for Tubular Qualifications in 2015 are in clause 9 however regardless, you should find a statement within the code that allows WPS's qualified to previous versions to be acceptable. So I would start there. However if you have to have 2015 compliant WPS's think about the below info.

Often errors in newly released codes that are addressed by errata sheets. Take a look at this and make sure your table you are viewing is not included. http://www.aws.org/library/doclib/errata-D1.1-D1.1M-2015.pdf

Below is the Text from the 2015 code about the reorginization of the Tubular requirements. Almost always there is an error in the tables in D1.1....Why ? Who knows.

The 2015 edition of the code has been reorganized. The tubular provisions, tables, and figures previously located throughout the code are now within Clause 9 entitled “Tubular Structures.” The reorganization required numerous reference changes and renumbering of the subclauses, tables, and figures. Many of the tables in Clause 4 contained provisions for Plate as well as Pipe or Tubing. The tables have been divided to only include Plate if contained in Clause 4 and Pipe or Tubing if contained in Clause 9. This separation of the information contained in the tables also resulted in many changes to the footnotes delineated in the tables.

Hope t his helps you in what you need.

Gerald Austin
Welding Inspection and Testing Services
Greeneville Tn.
423-914-1481
Topic Weld Size on a Fillet Weld By pipewelder_1999 Date 10-15-2016 22:19
No Idea what the wash is however if the profile in concave, the toe may interfere with the gage AND that method of measurement cannot be used. If only one leg is interfering, you could modify the bottom part of the gage and still maintain the throat measurement using the concave gauge.

If you are using the wrong side of the gauge, use the one for concave welds.

http://www.weldingdata.com/FilletWeldgage.htm

Gerald Austin
Topic TTS welding qualification By pipewelder_1999 Date 10-15-2016 22:10
I am sorry but I do not understand what you were asking in the 1st post nor your response. What I indicated in my previous post seems to be what you repeated in your 2nd post.

Hopefully you will get your question answered .
Topic TTS welding qualification By pipewelder_1999 Date 10-12-2016 11:55
I do not have a current SEC VIII however in the past, TTS specific qualifications were required only when invoked by the code of construction.

I do not fully understand the wording of your question.
Topic Stainless Tig Colors. How to preserve them. By pipewelder_1999 Date 10-12-2016 11:49
Far from obsolete.
Topic CWI Consultant/Independant Contractor By pipewelder_1999 Date 10-08-2016 17:12
I have called a few companies and not had much luck. Even the mention of general liability and welding has stopped a few quotes.

Do you have any companies you suggest that underwrite this type of insurance?
Topic CWI Consultant/Independant Contractor By pipewelder_1999 Date 10-07-2016 19:30
You mention professional liability insurance. Is it required on all of the projects you work on?

I understand the importance of having it as far as protecting yourself and your business but is it a "requirement" ?
Topic Recourse for certified welds NOT passing inspection? By pipewelder_1999 Date 10-01-2016 02:13
The term "Certified Welder" is the most abused and misunderstood term there is. One thing about welding is that there is a tremendous amount of variations in the skills and experiences of welder based upon industry and materials welded. A person may be "certified" for almost any type of weld from the easiest that can be trained for in hours to those requiring years of training and experience to get proficient.

The issue probably lies with the person who chose the welder without any understanding of the processes involved. A welder is "certified" when someone signs a document indicating a person has completed some type of task on a material, process, joint type, position, and other variables.

I would LOVE to see the project specifications written for this.

The inspector inspected the welds, did he verify the WPS (Welding Procedure Specification) ? Did he look at the fitup prior to the welding? Was he a "certified" welding inspector?

On the welds themselves some questions.

1) What was the acceptance criteria (Something that is ABSOLUTELY needed for someone to inspect)
2) Did the drawings show joint details in accordance with any code?
3) What was specified to the welder as to his/her qualification requirements ?
4) What if the "ART" looked bad, is there someone I can report it to ?
5)  Is the structure itself designed as a structurally sound structure? Are the joints of sufficient design to properly handle the service conditions? Did an engineer verify that it was sound?

Just a few of the many thoughts that this stirred up.
Topic Certified welds NOT passing inspection. Any recourse? By pipewelder_1999 Date 10-01-2016 02:10
The term "Certified Welder" is the most abused and misunderstood term there is. One thing about welding is that there is a tremendous amount of variations in the skills and experiences of welder based upon industry and materials welded. A person may be "certified" for almost any type of weld from the easiest that can be trained for in hours to those requiring years of training and experience to get proficient.

The issue probably lies with the person who chose the welder without any understanding of the processes involved. A welder is "certified" when someone signs a document indicating a person has completed some type of task on a material, process, joint type, position, and other variables.

I would LOVE to see the project specifications written for this.

The inspector inspected the welds, did he verify the WPS (Welding Procedure Specification) ? Did he look at the fitup prior to the welding? Was he a "certified" welding inspector?

On the welds themselves some questions.

1) What was the acceptance criteria (Something that is ABSOLUTELY needed for someone to inspect)
2) Did the drawings show joint details in accordance with any code?
3) What was specified to the welder as to his/her qualification requirements ?
4) What if the "ART" looked bad, is there someone I can report it to ?
5)  Is the structure itself designed as a structurally sound structure? Are the joints of sufficient design to properly handle the service conditions? Did an engineer verify that it was sound?

Just a few of the many thoughts that this stirred up.
Topic WPQ, wrong filler By pipewelder_1999 Date 09-28-2016 10:28
If the WPS was given to the welder and  wasn't followed , make him a NO HIRE!

If the test supervisor had one and didn't give it to the welder on paper or verbally, make him a no hire!

Of course just one man's opinion.
You must have a qualified WPS for testing. If the WPS allowed for any XX10 electrode, then life Its good.
Topic Need Some Work Help By pipewelder_1999 Date 09-19-2016 01:02
Wish I knew of something. Hope it all works out.
Topic New CWI, a little advice? By pipewelder_1999 Date 09-16-2016 01:09
Talk with the companies you have been working with as a welder. You will have more contacts that may be familiar with you.
Topic Relationship between hydrotest pressure and working pressur By pipewelder_1999 Date 09-14-2016 13:27
That's the place to get an accurate answer. I am not sure but each piping category may have specific information that applies to that category. MAWP is referred to I am sure but without a code handy I cannot say.
Topic New Forum By pipewelder_1999 Date 09-07-2016 12:41
Besides the format, I do like it. As an ex welding forum junkie, I do feel myself slipping back into multiple logins during the day.

But it is a MESS.
Topic Can i brazing with 99.99% fine silver wire? By pipewelder_1999 Date 09-06-2016 11:21
The eyeglass frames can be made of many different materials. Using a borax flux would not hurt anything. Regardless of what the filler metal does, the chances of oxidation/scaling are greatly reduced when using flux.

You could get on some jewelry making sites and probably get a better answer but except for a few alloys, I think flux would be the way to go.
Topic Metal Cored wire By pipewelder_1999 Date 09-04-2016 03:36
http://www.twi-global.com/technical-knowledge/job-knowledge/defects-solidification-cracking-044/

http://www.asminternational.org/documents/10192/1849770/06593G_Sample.pdf/bcce57ce-ef19-44e2-8d0e-88e5d23e5e05
Topic Metal Cored wire By pipewelder_1999 Date 09-04-2016 02:57
The center-line crease you see is probably the result of shrinkage and becomes more prominent with higher energy/travel speed welds. The last part to cool is usually along the center especially with a concave or flat profile.

A high depth to width ratio as in a deep penetrating fillet weld can cause shrinkage along the sides of the weld to be pretty rapid and the centerline of the weld has to absorb all of the shrinkage stress.

In extreme cases and certain conditions, it could be a crack however I have performed MT and PT on some of these indications and found nothing, in other cases I have.

A rapid travel speed, teardrop shaped puddle, and high voltages can work together to create this discontinuity. I would suggest cutting some samples and seeing if it is anything to be concerned with. Maybe it is, maybe it isnt.
Topic New Forum By pipewelder_1999 Date 09-03-2016 13:41
http://membernetwork.aws.org/
Topic NAVSEA S9074-AQ-GIB-010/248 NAVSEA S9074-AR-GIB-010/278 By pipewelder_1999 Date 09-02-2016 16:21
Gotcha. I think they will probably just develop something and get it off to a Levell III. Is the TP271 different than the old standard as far as LIII qualifications?

Thanks

Gerald.
Topic NAVSEA S9074-AQ-GIB-010/248 NAVSEA S9074-AR-GIB-010/278 By pipewelder_1999 Date 09-02-2016 11:28
I may have someone contact you. I was going to get something together here for a govt. contractor. I thought the course had to be product specific?

Gerald
Topic starting small business By pipewelder_1999 Date 09-01-2016 10:11
No. It would not fall under D1.1. That is for steel structures. Typically the designer/engineer of a product would decide what code/specification would apply.

Not sure what the product is etc... but someone/some organization has to design it, figure out if it will be strong enough, decide what must be controlled during manufacture, and BE PREPARED to be responsible for any losses due to failure.

Just "welding it per code" is only a small part. Who selects the code? Gotta Read the scope in each one.  Or write your own internal product specification.

Point is, there is much more to designing and building a product that some certifications if that product may fail and cause damage/injury. Not saying tons of things arent "made" daily that work and always will. It just takes on a different appearance when it becomes your business and you are concerned with liability.
Topic Houstin Schools - Arclabs By pipewelder_1999 Date 08-31-2016 11:28
Some community colleges coffer courses that are short in duration that can sometimes be useful for building or rebuilding your skills received during training that occurred in the past.

The usefulness of the training for your particular situation is widely based upon your existing skills, how you learn, and how the instructor teaches. We offered a 40 hour course for $525.00 that had people that had had never welded and some that had 8-10 years experience. All of those improved skills.

Lincoln Electric and other mfgs have training schools that have 1 and two week courses that I myself would love to sit in on, just to watch em teach. They may also be a great resource.
Topic starting small business By pipewelder_1999 Date 08-31-2016 11:12
Welcome to the forum as a participant. There are many on here with their own businesses and should give you some better answers.

Your need for "certification" is based upon the products you weld and the codes that govern them OR how you sell or market your services. You as the business owner decide how you are going to proceed as far as your quality system etc...

There is a bit more to fabrication of products that a "solid weld".  You may build a widget whacker in which all of the welds hold but the material fails because of design flaws related to the service.

Your welds are not backed really by anything other than how they perform. Regardless of how you do things, you will ALWAYS be responsible for what you do. All of the inspection and records will never relieve that. However being aware of all jurisdictional requirements (where they apply), industry codes/standards for your product(where they apply), and a system in place to control your processes (Quality Manual, inspections, Procedures etc...) will help you better control the quality of what you do and show an intent for you to try to do things correctly.

Read an R-1 form or RT reader sheet. Big waivers of liability for the inspection agencies however nothing for the manufacturer/contractor.

For your specific products, you could look at building procedures for welding that are specific to the materials, processes, and joints you will be using. Having a welder who has tested means nothing without a procedure qualified for the application. yes, a satisfactory weld can be made without ANY papers but we are talking more compliance.

You should receive some more information soon.

Have a great day
Topic New Forum By pipewelder_1999 Date 08-28-2016 12:48
I just went through this AM and made a few posts and tried to get caught up on what had been done, this is SOOOOO much easier.

Gerald

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